Category Archives: Lightroom

Cottage Perks

 

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One of the perks of staying in a well tricked-out cottage during your summer holidays is that you can often find interesting subjects indoors for an impromptu still life. This crackle-glazed bowl really woke up when some lovely green apples were placed inside. Lit by natural window light and one reflector.

Key Cottage in St. Mullins, County Carlow

Key Cottage, St Mullins

Key Cottage, St Mullins, beside the River Barrow in County Carlow, Ireland

While much of this former mill-worker’s home has been modernised, Key Cottage still has a corner that maintains some old world charm. This is the seat where I would read every morning before the others woke up. I added my canvas photo backpack and an old pair of  ‘veldtskoene’, to further the feeling of pseudo-nostalgia. The area is fascinating, and there is much walking and exploring to do in the vicinity, so the props are realistic. I’ll do a more extensive review of our Éire trip someday, but this photo does bring back warm memories!

Click on the Ireland category below to see more of the photos from our family holiday.

(11 May, 2014. Canon 5D Mk II with 24-105mm f4 L IS USM lens at 24mm. ISO 160 @ f22. 3 images in a HDR stack, processed with Nik software and Adobe Lightroom)

Waiting behind the barn…

Eyes within eyes...

Eyes within eyes…

A crowd of people were snapping shots of the horses as they were led to the barn, where they were placed in stalls with some feed. While they were being brushed down, I wandered around the building to find these windows, and the horse that would look up occasionally to peer outside.

Fort Edmonton, 14 September 2014.

Railway Decay

Detail on an old railway carriage.

Detail on an old railway carriage.

My main use for macro is nature photography, particualry the phtography of insects, spiders and other invertebrates. But macro is good for bringing out the detail in almost anything. In this case a simple painted bolt in an old railway carriage, with the paint flaking, and the  underlying wood now in decay.

Ballycarbery Castle, County Kerry

Ballycarbery Castle, an 'undeveloped' ruin, now used by cattle.

Ballycarbery Castle, an ‘undeveloped’ ruin, now used by cattle.

Ballycarbery Castle is an ‘enter-at-your-own-risk’ property, and we did. Some of the lower chambers are still whole, so you could scramble up to a higher level. There is turf and small trees growing there, and on the lower walls some ancient ivy plants still cling, giving the ruin the feeling of an Arthur Rackham print, sans fairies. Unfortunately the tower has been locked, so we could not venture higher.

St. Aidan’s Cathedral, Enniscorthy, County Wexford

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This is a vertical panorama of the interior of St. Aidan’s Cathedral in Enniscorthy, Wexford, Eire. It was designed by Augustus Welby Northmere Pugin (1812-1852) in the Gothic Revival style. Construction began in 1846, however, due to design problems, it was unable to be completed until 1871, when a smaller and lighter bell-tower was substituted for Pugin’s original overweight spire design. The latest restoration was in 1994.

Composed of six hand-held exposures, manual setting: ISO 2500, 1/60 sec. @ f6.3. Canon 5D Mk II with 24-105mm f4 L IS USM lens (@ 24mm). Images processed in Adobe Lightroom, assembled in Microsoft Ice and sharpened and de-noised with Nik software.